Norway

Boathouse | TYIN tegnestue by Unknown

















This used to be a traditional Norwegian boathouse for boat and fishing gear storage. The existing condition of the boathouse was decayed and had to be torn down, but placement of sensible honest materials has revived this simple house to be a recreational space for summer time. 
















Most of the materials that were used were salvaged and reused. The windows from the client’s farmhouse were also used on the project. Norwegian pine saturated with a by-product from the sugar cane industry gives the exterior cladding a grey patina.





































Learn more about this project here!

A Glass Conservatory by Michelle Linden






This conservatory by Helen & Hard is a very interesting structure. Built to replace an outbuilding that had previously stood in that location 120 years ago, this glass structure is adjacent to an existing log structure. Colored glass beams support the glass roof above, while hinged stone walls open the view to the park beyond. I think what makes this project really lovely are the surprises... glass unexpectedly being the solid support system, and the movable stone acting as a system of transparency...
Lovely.
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Mortensrud Kirke by Michelle Linden







I quite like the light that comes in this church (by Jan Olav Jensen and Børre Skodvin) as a result of the gaps in mortar... At least, I think that's how the light is coming in. And, if that's the case... what keeps the cold air/weather/bugs out?
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Initially, the first two images reminded be of Studio Gang's Starlight Theatre, but when I looked up the built photos, I guess I was just remembering the model. Either way, the ambient light, simple forms, and exposed structure in this church are quite beautiful and I imagine it emits a lovely glow into the woods at night.
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Invigorating by Michelle Linden

Ok... just to warn you, I've got a ton of photos of the Venice Biennale (some of them are labeled, more are not). If you ever have a chance to visit, I would highly recommend it... Especially, if you are like me, and feeling a bit jaded by work. The Biennale was so invigorating and refreshing, and really reminded me of all the things I love about architecture... Oh, and I saw David Adjaye. But, don't worry... I didn't run up to him like a groupie or anything!

UN Studio
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Scotland
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Romania?
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Lot Ek?
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Luxembourg
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I should really remember this firm... especially since I know they are Seattle based...
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Australia
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Belgium (After the Party)
This was my favorite installation... more than any other installation, you really experienced this space.
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Beligium
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Ben Nicholson (a former professor of mine... a bit disappointing, but fun to see)
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Brazil (original exhibition structure)
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Original Carlo Scarpa Structure
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Norway (those sliding glass doors are INSANE)
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Droog (One of my all time favorite design collaboratives)
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Frank Gehry (he should really stick to furniture)
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Frank Gehry
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Herzog & deMueron
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Israel
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Ove Arup
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Russia
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Zaha Hadid
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Finally, Some Images by Michelle Linden







Its been almost exactly one year since C & I watched the Snohetta piece on wide angle... I don't remember seeing any designs during the show, mainly I remember watching the architects meeting with the different sheiks and their representatives. Now that Snohetta has won the competition for the King Abdulaziz Center of Knowledge and Culture and images are available (I'm guessing that most people have already seen them...), I'm not sure what I think. I'd be very interested in seeing more interior images and plans and sections if they are available. Beyond the fact that I'm not sure if I even like the form, I'm actually concerned about the scale of the architectural movements. I think that when we design at such a large scale, its easy to ignore the human scale factor. Big statements make a much bigger impact, particularly when vying to be selected from a field of talented and well known competitors. Still, ultimately the building has to be used by people. And when that happens, you've got to hope that the architects have spent as much time designing the usable features of the building as they have designing the form. Without many interior images, I worry that this a project where the dynamic form has taken total precedence over function. Maybe this is what the sheik was looking for... a big statement. But, in my humble opinion, if architecture is going to be successful its got to be usable just as much as it is beautiful.
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