Installation Art

Mirror Labyrinth NY by Unknown





New York's Brooklyn Bridge Park is offering whimsical and interactive installations as part of an exhibition by Public Art Fund. This exhibit encourages viewers to touch, walk through, and engage with the art, allowing viewers to overcome the typical distance expected at venues like a museum. In addition to the Mirror Labyrinth featured above, the exhibition includes Appearing Rooms, a room enclosed by walls made of jets of water, and several unique park benches. Read more about the project here!

Pull Some Strings by Unknown







This week we're loving this installation by Atelier YokYok at St. Stephen's Cathedral in Cahors, southwest France. Called Les Voûtes Filantes, or The Shooting Vaults, this stunning installation was created by stretching blue string between different thin metal arch frames typical of Gothic architecture to echo the style of the cathedral. The strings merge into the shapes of the arches, creating beautiful tunnels that are a whimsical play on light and space. Read more about the project here!

'architectural anthropomorphism' by Michelle Linden












This installation at the Palais de Tokyo by Henrique Oliveira is quite spectacular. As she describes it, the expression of the twisting organic trees breaking free of the existing columnar structure are a form of architectural anthropomorphism. No matter what you call it, I think the result is pretty amazing. I'd love to take a walk through this space.

Via Dezeen

Sauna as Acupuncture by Michelle Linden






Marco Casagrande is a Finnish architecture working in Taiwan... He's fairly well-known for The Chen House, but as this project proves, he is thoughtful and considerate in all of his work.
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This insertion of a Finnish sauna into an eastern urban fabric hopes to provide a point in which we can experience both the modern and the ancient. Rather than paraphrase all the ways in which this project aims to affect the city's chi, I would highly recommend visiting Marco's site dedicated to this project. It is well worth the read...
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