Chile

Agrotourism and Architecture by Michelle Linden





This design of an observation deck in Pinohuacho Chile is remarkable not only for its simple and lovely design... but also for the story behind the design. The region has been shaped by years of timid recovery after a 1971 volcanic eruption. With the land losing its value, villagers have been forced to move to the city. Not wanting to lose his way of life, Miguel Vázquez talks to his father about the possibility of agrotourism, where the land will be carefully cultivated to be enjoyed by villagers and visitors alike. The whole family has begun to take part, as well as the rest of the village. Their intent is to create a landscape that embraces the natural environment, therefore the architectural designs need to reflect the surrounding countryside, as well as the traditional sustainable building materials and methods. Its really a lovely project, with a lovely story...

For more information see Arch Daily and the architect's blog (Rodrigo Sheward Giordano)
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Chilean Landmark/Benchmark by Michelle Linden




These Chilean landmark/benchmarks are as much art installation as they are civic architecture. Three architecture students, R. Hernández, M. Valdés, and O. Véliz created these pieces as a means to delineate an ancient path. These modules give visitors a direction, as well as a place to sit. The pieces themselves are all built from small sections of wood, none larger than 16 centimeters. The combination of structural imagery and tactile craft is really great... I just love this project!
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Chalet C6 by dRN by Michelle Linden





Del Rio-Nunez Arquitectos designed this ski chalet for two avid skiers, locating it just out of sight of the hotel during the winter months. The architects were able to take full advantage of the sweeping vistas, while still working within the design constraints of 6 meter deep snow and ice loads. The result is an amazing structure that manages to retain an inner warmth despite the freezing temperatures outsides. The integration of snow and living and the use of snow as a finish material reminds me of the Natural Science Museum in Japan...

Sebastian Irarrazaval Arquitecto by Michelle Linden

I found this Chilean architect through Dezeen. I'm very impressed with the play of light and shadows produced in this particular house... However, when reading through Irarrazaval's website, I was most impressed and intrigued with his news section. Many architects maintain a news section as a list of links to recent publications, however Irarrazaval's news is actually a link to his blog (which as we all know can truly be kept up to date). Its a very clever and forward thinking move for an established architecture firm.